Because I love him, I love Rushmore, and, controversies aside, I kind of love her too.
I remember that one time in my Visual Grammar of Cinema class when a pedantic prick from the English Department sneered at her work, calling it “Facile. Sophomoric, at best.” Seriously, that class was as dry as hell and I could’ve done without Umberto Eco’s Articulations on the Cinematic Code, or, yes, even the immortal Walter Benjamin and his thoughts on art in the age of mechanical reproduction (I’m not kidding; this must have been assigned at least four times when I was in grad school). Just keeping it real, yo.
Pauline Kael, on the other hand? Here was a bitch who wrote about ACTUAL films, and who sounded like a LIVING, PULSING being. The self-described “Critical Theorists” in our class snobbishly turned their noses up at her writing and rolled their eyes at the mention of Kael—as if she were, I don’t know, Owen Gleiberman or Richard Roeper or Lisa Schwarzbaum. I was the only fangirl in the classroom, and she was reviled for her accessibility, more than anything.  
Ugh. Academics. Thank God that chapter of my life is over and done with.
-mags 
thepenguinpress:

That time Wes Anderson forced a retired Pauline Kael to watch “Rushmore” in a movie theater:

I already had Pauline Kael’s phone number because I’d found it when I was looking through somebody’s Rolodex a couple of years ago.
”Hello. My name is Wes Anderson. I’m calling for Pauline Kael, please.” I had immediately recognized her voice (from a tape I have of her on ”The Dick Cavett Show”) when she answered the telephone, but I wanted to give her a chance to introduce herself.
”Who are you?” she said, suspicious and steely. I paused.
”I’m a filmmaker, and I’ve just finished a movie called ‘Rushmore,’ and I was hoping maybe I could …”
”How long is it?”
”Ninety minutes.”
”Ninety?”
”Or slightly less. Ninety-ish,” I said.
”That’s a long ‘Rushmore.’ ”
I hesitated. I thought she was making a joke, but I didn’t get it. I said, ”Well, it’s got a pretty quick pace.”
”What’d you do on it?”
”I directed it.”
”Who wrote it?”
”Me and my friend Owen Wilson.”
”Who’s in it?”
”Bill Murray.” This was my trump card. I knew from her reviews that Bill Murray was one of her favorite comedians.
”Which Bill Murray?”
There was a silence. ”The Bill Murray. You know Bill Murray. You love Bill Murray.”
”What was he in?”
My mind drew a blank. ”What was he in?” I repeated the question. I could only think of one title. ” ‘Meatballs,’ ” I said.
It didn’t ring a bell. ”You’ll know him when you see him.”
She laughed uncomfortably and said, ”O.K.” She asked if ”Rushmore” was my first film, and I told her no, that I’d directed a movie called ”Bottle Rocket.”
There was another silence.
”Well, lets hope this one’s not too thrown together.”
I thought about this. ”How do you mean thrown together?” I said.
She didn’t answer. I waited. She laughed quietly, and then she seemed to warm up all of a sudden: ”O.K., send me the tape,” she said.
”Actually, to tell you the truth, I’d prefer to screen it for you. Is there a movie theater near you?”
She paused. ”There’s the Triplex.”
”Let me show it to you at the Triplex.”
She sounded skeptical. ”How are we going to do that?”
”I’ll get the studio to set it up.”
”That could be expensive,” she said.
”Well. Let’s stick it to them,” I said.
She liked the sound of this. ”O.K., let’s stick it to them,” she said. She told me she didn’t drive, and that someone would have to pick her up and take her to the theater.
I said: ”I’ll do it myself. How do I get to your house?”
”I don’t know,” she said.
”O.K. I’ll figure it out.”
A few weeks later I drove from Cambridge to Ms. Kael’s house in Great Barrington, Mass. I brought some cookies with me which I thought I would offer her during the first reel.
Her house is stone and shingle and very large, and I saw a deer duck into the trees at the corner of the yard as I came up the driveway. I knocked on the screen door and she looked out. She was sitting in a wooden chair. ”My God, you’re just a kid,” she said.
She told me to open the door. I tried it. I told her it was locked. She told me the lock had been stiff for 20 years, and that I should just fiddle with it. She said she knew it was 20 years because she’d just finished paying off her mortgage.
I fiddled with the lock for a minute and got the door open. We shook hands and I said: ”It’s very nice to meet you. How are you?”
”Old,” she said.
She was a few inches under 5 feet tall, and she stood shakily with a metal cane that had four legs at the base. We both had on New Balance sneakers.
She has Parkinson’s, which makes her shake a little bit and leaves her unsteady. She told me she had been in the hospital with meningitis during the week after we spoke on the telephone, which explained her forgetting who Bill Murray was. She told me I would have to hold her hand and help her get around, and I told her that would be just fine. On the way to the theater she told me she’d invited her friend Dorothy to join us. ”I would’ve gotten a group together, but I didn’t want to have too many people, in case the movie isn’t any good.” I nodded and pulled into the driveway next to the theater. There was a small-town police station there, and I stopped in front of it.
”You can’t park here, Wes.”
”Oh, I think we’ll be O.K.”
She shook her head. She said that this was proof I was a movie director. No one else would think they could double-park in front of a police station.
We went into the lobby and she introduced me to Dorothy. ”This is Wes Anderson. He’s responsible for whatever it is we’re about to see.” Then Ms. Kael told me I should change my name. ”Wes Anderson is a terrible name for a movie director.” Dorothy agreed.
(More)

Because I love him, I love Rushmore, and, controversies aside, I kind of love her too.

I remember that one time in my Visual Grammar of Cinema class when a pedantic prick from the English Department sneered at her work, calling it “Facile. Sophomoric, at best.” Seriously, that class was as dry as hell and I could’ve done without Umberto Eco’s Articulations on the Cinematic Code, or, yes, even the immortal Walter Benjamin and his thoughts on art in the age of mechanical reproduction (I’m not kidding; this must have been assigned at least four times when I was in grad school). Just keeping it real, yo.

Pauline Kael, on the other hand? Here was a bitch who wrote about ACTUAL films, and who sounded like a LIVING, PULSING being. The self-described “Critical Theorists” in our class snobbishly turned their noses up at her writing and rolled their eyes at the mention of Kael—as if she were, I don’t know, Owen Gleiberman or Richard Roeper or Lisa Schwarzbaum. I was the only fangirl in the classroom, and she was reviled for her accessibility, more than anything.  

Ugh. Academics. Thank God that chapter of my life is over and done with.

-mags 

thepenguinpress:

That time Wes Anderson forced a retired Pauline Kael to watch “Rushmore” in a movie theater:

I already had Pauline Kael’s phone number because I’d found it when I was looking through somebody’s Rolodex a couple of years ago.

”Hello. My name is Wes Anderson. I’m calling for Pauline Kael, please.” I had immediately recognized her voice (from a tape I have of her on ”The Dick Cavett Show”) when she answered the telephone, but I wanted to give her a chance to introduce herself.

”Who are you?” she said, suspicious and steely. I paused.

”I’m a filmmaker, and I’ve just finished a movie called ‘Rushmore,’ and I was hoping maybe I could …”

”How long is it?”

”Ninety minutes.”

”Ninety?”

”Or slightly less. Ninety-ish,” I said.

”That’s a long ‘Rushmore.’ ”

I hesitated. I thought she was making a joke, but I didn’t get it. I said, ”Well, it’s got a pretty quick pace.”

”What’d you do on it?”

”I directed it.”

”Who wrote it?”

”Me and my friend Owen Wilson.”

”Who’s in it?”

”Bill Murray.” This was my trump card. I knew from her reviews that Bill Murray was one of her favorite comedians.

”Which Bill Murray?”

There was a silence. ”The Bill Murray. You know Bill Murray. You love Bill Murray.”

”What was he in?”

My mind drew a blank. ”What was he in?” I repeated the question. I could only think of one title. ” ‘Meatballs,’ ” I said.

It didn’t ring a bell. ”You’ll know him when you see him.”

She laughed uncomfortably and said, ”O.K.” She asked if ”Rushmore” was my first film, and I told her no, that I’d directed a movie called ”Bottle Rocket.”

There was another silence.

”Well, lets hope this one’s not too thrown together.”

I thought about this. ”How do you mean thrown together?” I said.

She didn’t answer. I waited. She laughed quietly, and then she seemed to warm up all of a sudden: ”O.K., send me the tape,” she said.

”Actually, to tell you the truth, I’d prefer to screen it for you. Is there a movie theater near you?”

She paused. ”There’s the Triplex.”

”Let me show it to you at the Triplex.”

She sounded skeptical. ”How are we going to do that?”

”I’ll get the studio to set it up.”

”That could be expensive,” she said.

”Well. Let’s stick it to them,” I said.

She liked the sound of this. ”O.K., let’s stick it to them,” she said. She told me she didn’t drive, and that someone would have to pick her up and take her to the theater.

I said: ”I’ll do it myself. How do I get to your house?”

”I don’t know,” she said.

”O.K. I’ll figure it out.”

A few weeks later I drove from Cambridge to Ms. Kael’s house in Great Barrington, Mass. I brought some cookies with me which I thought I would offer her during the first reel.

Her house is stone and shingle and very large, and I saw a deer duck into the trees at the corner of the yard as I came up the driveway. I knocked on the screen door and she looked out. She was sitting in a wooden chair. ”My God, you’re just a kid,” she said.

She told me to open the door. I tried it. I told her it was locked. She told me the lock had been stiff for 20 years, and that I should just fiddle with it. She said she knew it was 20 years because she’d just finished paying off her mortgage.

I fiddled with the lock for a minute and got the door open. We shook hands and I said: ”It’s very nice to meet you. How are you?”

”Old,” she said.

She was a few inches under 5 feet tall, and she stood shakily with a metal cane that had four legs at the base. We both had on New Balance sneakers.

She has Parkinson’s, which makes her shake a little bit and leaves her unsteady. She told me she had been in the hospital with meningitis during the week after we spoke on the telephone, which explained her forgetting who Bill Murray was. She told me I would have to hold her hand and help her get around, and I told her that would be just fine. On the way to the theater she told me she’d invited her friend Dorothy to join us. ”I would’ve gotten a group together, but I didn’t want to have too many people, in case the movie isn’t any good.” I nodded and pulled into the driveway next to the theater. There was a small-town police station there, and I stopped in front of it.

”You can’t park here, Wes.”

”Oh, I think we’ll be O.K.”

She shook her head. She said that this was proof I was a movie director. No one else would think they could double-park in front of a police station.

We went into the lobby and she introduced me to Dorothy. ”This is Wes Anderson. He’s responsible for whatever it is we’re about to see.” Then Ms. Kael told me I should change my name. ”Wes Anderson is a terrible name for a movie director.” Dorothy agreed.

(More)

(via oldfilmsflicker)